David and Goliath: Spiritual 20/20

Spiritual 20/20

Eye exams. They’re getting harder. It’s not like anyone’s changed the questions, but every year, the letters shrink. I look through the lenses. Which is better? One? Or two? With each click, my vision moves from blurry to clear. Fuzzy to focused.

In 1 Samuel 17, the story of David and Goliath, God’s conducting a spiritual eye exam. Two armies face off in a valley to witness a battle to the death. Winner take all.

Israel has to be thrilled at the thought of single combat. It wasn’t that long ago when the king and his son carried the only weapons—in the entire army. Single combat? Awesome! No full-scale bloody battle today. Whew!

Until the Philistines send out their champion.

And he’s nine feet tall.

Collective groan from the Israelites. Seriously? Where do they find these guys, and what are they feeding them?

And the eye exam begins.

King Saul and the Israelite army see:

  • An army that has plagued Israel since Samson’s time
  • 125 lbs. of armor
  • A big bully talking trash on the battlefield

So, they stall.

For forty days.

Young David comes on the scene. An errand boy sent by his dad to check up on his big brothers and to bring them some food. It’s David’s turn and, click, click, his vision sees way beyond 20/20.

David sees a guy.

A guy whose nation has harmed Israel.

David’s people.

God’s people.

And this guy has nothing on God.

Note the difference. The others compared Goliath to themselves and their own abilities. David compares Goliath to God—and it’s no contest.

So, he suits up. Sling, staff, stones. Check.

Now Goliath takes a turn in the chair. He’s not seeing too well either. He sees a kid.

David adjusts Goliath’s lenses in verses 45-47:

“David said to the Philistine, ‘You come against me with sword and spear and javelin, but I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the Lord will deliver you into my hands, and I’ll strike you down and cut off your head. This very day I will give the carcasses of the Philistine army to the birds and the wild animals, and the whole world will know that there is a God in Israel. All those gathered here will know that it is not by sword or spear that the Lord saves; for the battle is the Lord’s, and he will give all of you into our hands.’”

Goliath’s vision fades to black. Permanently.

Why could David see what others could not? The Holy Spirit.

J. Oswald Sanders said, “Eyes that look are common; eyes that see are rare.”

Eyes that see have been touched by the Holy Spirit. Click, click, and you see things you didn’t see a moment ago.

Instead of seeing a hostile co-worker, you’ll see someone who is hurting and needs a friend.

Instead of seeing that annoying relative, you’ll see someone you can encourage.

Instead of seeing a bad day, you’ll see an opportunity to draw near to God.

Make an appointment for a spiritual eye exam and learn to truly see.

Questions:

When have you looked at a situation?

When have you seen a situation?

What made the difference?

Are you consistently praying for God’s perspective on:

Your work?

Your marriage?

Your family?

Your relationships?

Tweetables:

The others compared Goliath to themselves and their own abilities. Click to tweet.

David compares Goliath to God—and it’s no contest. Click to tweet.

J. Oswald Sanders said, “Eyes that look are common; eyes that see are rare.” Click to tweet.

Eyes that see have been touched by the Holy Spirit. Click to tweet.